Review of Sockupied Fall 2015

I was invited to review the Fall 2015 issue of Sockupied by the lovely Amy Palmer. Here is what you need to know!

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What is it?

This Sockupied issue contains six original sock patterns as well as some interest stories, including one about designer Debbie O’Neill and a piece on the history of sock knitting in Russia. The patterns are moderate to advanced in difficulty as far as sock knitting goes, and feature some really interesting colour work, textures, and constructions. The patterns might be a bit daunting for a brand new sock knitter, but for any established sock knitters out there this might be exactly the thing to spice up your pattern collection. There doesn’t seem to be a theme to the issue (unless the theme is “yarn colours Nicole finds personally offensive”) but the lack of theme kind of works. Not everything needs to be thematically connected, and what it means is six very different and unique patterns. So, along those lines, let’s talk…

Patterns

The backbone of any knitting publication is the patterns. This issue of Sockupied contains six sock patterns from various designers including Kate Atherley and Debbie O’Neill. What makes me excited to buy a pattern book is often the opportunity to experiment with new techniques and here the issue is really great. In terms of colour work you have the electrostatic lines socks (featured on the cover), as well as these checkers socks.

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Okay, so I am never going to love that colour combination, but those are some seriously rockin’ socks. The back of the leg, heel and sole are all worked flat, and then joined with the front of the sock. Colour me impressed. Pun absolutely intended. I personally would buy the book just to learn how to do that, but that’s me.

There are some texture based patterns including the walking in the woods socks, the riband socks and the hominy socks. The hominy socks are a little simpler, for those of you looking for something more straight forward.

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My personal favourite are the Gladys Thompson socks by Kate Atherley. Inspired by classic Gansey stitch patterns, the look is classic and not too busy (a.k.a. I will actually wear them.)

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Aesthetic

Sometimes the appeal of something (yarn) is in what it looks like (yarn) or feels like (yarn) to you. I have bought pattern books on occasion solely because they were very beautiful, and I wanted to be able to flip through them for inspiration. Photography plays a big role here, as does layout. The photography of the book is good, but not knock-your-socks-off groundbreaking. I will say this though: the layout is excellent. If you are the sort that likes to print off your patterns, a clear effort has been put in to make them very easy to follow and printer friendly. A tip of my cap to whoever was responsible for that, very well done. Bonus points as well for the glossary at the back explaining the some of the techniques.

The Verdict

Let’s get down to brass tacts, is this something worth your $11.99? If you are an avid sock knitter that likes trying new things, or are looking to dive back into sock knitting with something exciting, this issue is absolutely worth it.  I would caution beginners away from it, unless you are particularly ambitious (and patient with yourself). Overall it’s a very solid collection and the side articles were interesting and well written. If you are interested, you can purchase the issue from Interweave Knits here.

Do you like to knit socks? Have any sock projects lined up for this coming autumn? Let me know in the comments. Happy Knitting!

**Please note that all photography in this post is credited to Sockupied/Harper Point Photography**

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